Organized Crime and Waste Management

Author: Regina Paulose

 

For several years, the U.S. government had been collecting a small fee for nuclear waste storage. Although the fee was being collected through consumer electric bills, the government had not begun to store nuclear waste. The fees collected went into a fund. In 2014, a federal court ordered the government to stop collecting the fee. That year, the fund was estimated to be at $31 billion dollars. Continue reading

Counterfeit Drugs in the International Landscape

Author: Regina Paulose

In 2012, customs authorities in Angola inspected speakers which were being shipped from China to local markets in Angola and uncovered 1.4 million packets of counterfeit anti-malarial drugs.[1] In 2013, the US Federal Drug Administration shut down an illegal counterfeit drug ring of 1,677 illegal pharmacy websites. The investigation revealed links to large organized drug networks possibly from Russia, the Middle East, and India.[2] During that same year, China arrested close to 1,300 people in the same kind of operation shutting down 140 fake pharmacy websites and confiscating material worth $362.4 million dollars.[3] Successful cases of counterfeit medicine busts seem to be few and far between around the world. Continue reading

Gangs and Organized Crime in Mexico: An Interview with Professor Scott Decker

Scott Decker is a foundation professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University at the Downtown Campus. He is also affiliated faculty with the Center on the Future of War. He earned the Ph.D. in Criminology from Florida State University. His research interests include gangs, criminal justice policy, violence and the organizational structure of crime groups such as drug smugglers, human traffickers and terror groups. His most recent book, Confronting Gangs: Crime and Community, was published in 2013 by Oxford University Press. He is co-author of Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling (Temple University Press, 2008) a study of the highest level drug smugglers in US prisons. Continue reading

Corporate Liability under the Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime

Author: Regina Paulose

From October 6-7, 2014, the Working Group of Government Experts on Technical Assistance will meet in Vienna, Austria for its 7th session of the Conference of Parties for the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (CATOC).  The provisional agenda includes a discussion of the “liability of legal persons” which is commonly referred to as corporations. Continue reading

North Korea Sanctions – #Epic Fail

By: Regina Paulose[1]

North Korea (or DPRK) has continued to prove that the sanctions policy against its leadership is a failure. The DPRK has continued to subvert sanctions by earning hard currency through illegitimate means.  It essentially works as an organized crime group. It is important for the international community, in particular the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), to distance itself from its same old paternal routine and think of ways to constructively engage the country so that it can effectively make a difference with regards to proliferation and human rights and so that North Korea can turn away from using illicit channels to raise money. Continue reading

Turning the Tide: Preventing violence against PWA

Written by: Regina Paulose

“The cruelty to and murder of African albinos has not been as widely publicized in our popular media. It should. There’s nothing more abhorrent, nothing more evil than the use of a human soul to expiate some evil spirit; nothing worse than to inflict repeated, continuous pain to a child whose only sin is having been born with a minor genetic variation.”1 Continue reading

The Rohingya Revisited

Written by:  Regina Paulose

Nearly a year ago, I wrote an article outlining reasons why the ICC should take action in Myanmar (also known as Burma) in order to stop continued religious and ethnic violence towards the Rohingya. During 2013, not surprisingly, the anti-Muslim violence in Myanmar has continued.[1] In fact, violence has spread beyond targeting the Rohingya and against the larger Muslim population.[2] Although the majority displaced from the violence are still the Rohingya. Continue reading