Female Victims Only? Casting Doubt on the Prosecution of Forced Marriage in Ongwen’s Case

Author: Laura Nacyte*

In December 2016, the trial against Dominic Ongwen, a former commander of Uganda’s rebel Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), commenced before the Trial Chamber IX of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Remarkably, the defendant is the first person at the ICC to face the charge of forced marriage. The latter was brought in addition to other charges of sexual and gender-based crimes, including rape, sexual slavery, enslavement, and forced pregnancy. Although not a separate offence under the Rome Statute, forced marriage is prosecuted as an ‘other inhumane act’, a crime against humanity, pursuant to Article 7(1)(k). Continue reading

Forced Sterilization: Problem Solved?

Author: Regina Paulose

In 1927 the US Supreme Court heard the case of Carrie Buck, a “feeble minded” woman, who was locked up in a state institution. The laws in Virginia gave the superintendent of the institution authority to determine that if it was in the “best interest of the patients and of society” the inmate may be sexually sterilized.  The US Supreme Court voted in favor of Virginia’s statute on forced sterilization. Continue reading

Organized Crime and Waste Management

Author: Regina Paulose

 

For several years, the U.S. government had been collecting a small fee for nuclear waste storage. Although the fee was being collected through consumer electric bills, the government had not begun to store nuclear waste. The fees collected went into a fund. In 2014, a federal court ordered the government to stop collecting the fee. That year, the fund was estimated to be at $31 billion dollars. Continue reading

End Conversion Therapy for Minors

Author: Regina Paulose

Conversion therapy (also known as “reparative,” “re-orientation,” or “cure” therapy) is a type of psychotherapy which professionals or ex-gay ministries use to allegedly “cure” or “help” a person who is gay eliminate or suppress feelings towards the same sex. Continue reading

Environmental Injustice in Taiwan

Taiwan is home to 16 aboriginal tribes; among these tribes are the Tao (also known as the Yami) peoples who inhabit Orchid Island, some 65 miles off the coast of Taiwan. In the 1980’s, unbeknownst to the Tao people, the tip of Orchid Island was turned into a nuclear waste dump. Continue reading

UK EU Referendum and the UK’s role on the world stage

Author: Richard Mark Hampson

The UK EU referendum will have significant important consequences for the UK’s international role. If the UK were to leave the EU, it would remain an important global player. This would be, not least, because of its permanent seat on the UN Security Council. Continue reading

Is Extradition under risk under the EU?

Author: Richard Mark Hampson

On 5 April 2016, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled that the execution of a European Arrest Warrant (‘EAW’) must be deferred if there is a real risk of inhuman or degrading treatment because of the conditions of detention for the person concerned in the requesting state. If the existence of that risk cannot be discounted within a reasonable period, the authority responsible for the execution of the warrant must decide whether the surrender procedure should be deferred or brought to an end. Continue reading