Propriety of Intervention of the International Criminal Court in the Boko Haram Situation in Nigeria

Izuchukwu Temilade Nwagbara Esq

The concept of international criminal law, which became prominent after the second world war with the Nuremberg trials, purports to prosecute crimes against humanity of a large and systematic scale/nature in a furious attempt to end impunity in human relations.[1] As such, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC)[2]—the primary treaty in international criminal law—provides that the ICC shall have jurisdiction with respect to the crime of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crimes of aggression.[3] In relation to the Boko Haram[4] situation in Nigeria, crimes against humanity and war crimes are the most relevant as regards the jurisdiction of the ICC.[5] Therefore, this post examines the possibility and the propriety of a prosecution of Boko Haram members in the ICC for their actions which come under the jurisdiction of the court.

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Aligning the Stars: Sustainable Development and Space Justice

Tamara Blagojevic

Having in mind that the environment itself consists of different ecosystems, whether on earth, in the air or even in space, and considering that their similarities are preconditioned by their belonging to the natural environment – it would be hard not to conclude that a multidisciplinary approach and transplanting adequate regulation in comparable situations, would be not just applicable, but highly desirable in the fast changing and developing society where technology and industry keep winning the race with regulation.

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Employing Enforced Disappearance as a Framework; a Game Changer in Seeking Justice for Iran’s 1980s Atrocities

Shadi Sadr*

“It’s been over thirty years, but my mum won’t let us change the key to our home. She keeps saying if my brother comes back and we are away, he must be able to use his key and not to linger outside.” The sister of a victim of disappearance during the decade-long political cleansing by the newly established Islamic regime after the 1979 revolution in Iran once told me this.

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Brainwashing the Uighurs: Violations of the CAT

Qaila Sarwar

The Uighurs

It is estimated that just under one million people have been placed into what the Chinese Government have termed ‘re-education centres’, in order to ostensibly combat extremist views and religious-based terrorism. The Xinjiang Government and educational institutional websites state that these centres are scholastic facilities designed to  ‘…wash clean the brains of people who have become bewitched by the extreme religious ideologies of the three forces.’ According to several ‘leaked’ documents by the Chinese Authorities, it is estimated that around 15,000 people were sent to these camps within just one week in 2017, showing the sheer scale of the attack on Uighur Muslims by the Chinese Government. These documents were also said to include a memo which have strict instructions from the highest security official at the time, explaining that the camps are to be run as ‘high security prisons with strict discipline, punishments and no escapes’. Having said this, it is unclear how much weight we can attribute to these ‘leaked documents’ as the Chinese Government are staying extremely silent on the matter and denying any human rights breaches within these camps.

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Cameroon’s Hidden Crisis

Reuben Moses

For two years in a row, Cameroon, beset by a civil armed conflict in the West and Boko Haram insurgency in the North, has topped the Norwegian Refugee Council’s (NRC) list of the “most neglected displacement crises in the world.” The NRC based its determination on three factors: the lack of political will among the fighting parties and international actors to find peaceful solutions to conflict, lack of media attention, and lack of international monetary aid. Indeed, in the shadows of more prominent international events, Cameroon has largely escaped attention. The sporadic news story decrying of one of Cameroon’s more horrific moments occasionally surfaces—for instance, the world took notice when government forces entered Ngarbuh in the Northwest Region and massacred 22 civilians in mid-February. Largely, however, the international response to Cameroon’s repeated human rights abuses and superficial solutions has leaned on statements or calls for action backed by few practical efforts. International actors, particularly those with significant economic or cultural ties to Cameroon, must substantively involve themselves in Cameroon’s most pressing crises and exert their influence to stop the bleeding.

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