UEFA and the Military Salute Investigation – Part II

Yahya Kemal Aksu

Continued from Part I

General Principles of Conduct

According to the article 11 (1) of UEFA DC “Member associations and clubs, as well as their players, officials and members, and all persons assigned by UEFA to exercise a function, must respect the Laws of the Game, as well as UEFA’s Statutes, regulations, directives and decisions, and comply with the principles of ethical conduct, loyalty, integrity and sportsmanship.”Accordingly, 11 (2) (b) prohibits conducts insulting or otherwise violations on the basic rules of decent conduct, 11 (2) (c) prohibits the use of sporting events for manifestations of a non-sporting nature and 11 (2) (d) also prohibits conduct which brings the sport of football, and UEFA in particular, into disrepute. Continue reading

UEFA and the Military Salute Investigation – Part I

Yahya Kemal AKSU

Introduction

Within the scope of participation to UEFA European Football Championship (Euro 2020), in Qualifying rounds, Group H, Turkey played against Albania on October 11, 2019 and France on October 14 respectively. In both matches, after the team had scored goals, Turkish players displayed “military salute” gestures and accordingly UEFA has appointed an inspector in order to initiate disciplinary investigations with regard to “potential provocative political behaviour” nature of the gesture. Continue reading

Demystifying the Supreme Court’s judgment in the Ayodhya dispute

Taanya Trivedi

In a historic judgment by the Honourable Supreme Court of India (SCI), the Court put to rest a volatile dispute dating back to 1885 that has been “a flashpoint of continued conflagration,”[1] which has caused enormous loss of life and has unleashed sectarian violence across the country. Continue reading

The Rohingya Genocide Continues

Regina Paulose

International crimes against the Rohingya have been perpetrated for decades and continues in the status quo, even after the alarming events of August 2017 that forced 700,00+ Rohingya people to flee into Bangladesh. Since that time there has been little progress made to achieve a long term solution for the Rohingya people. Continue reading

Racial injustice in the United States and the international response

Author: Dr. Thamil Venthan Ananthavinayagan, PhD (NUI Galway), LL.M. (Maastricht University) Lecturer for International Law at Griffith College, Dublin/Ireland

Introduction:

In 2016 the Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent (hereafter: the Working Group) visited the United States of America (hereafter: USA), one of the many special procedures under the auspices of the United Nations Human Rights Council, in order to assess the treatment and situation of people with African Descent in the country. With their report, the Working Group concluded that

[C]ontemporary police killings and the trauma that they create are reminiscent of the past racial terror of lynching. Impunity for state violence has resulted in the current human rights crisis and must be addressed as a matter of urgency.[1]

The current atmosphere in the USA reveals a quite blunt manifestation of a deeply divided and troubled society, a society that is haunted by its past and offers a bare view of the remnants of slavery that preoccupies the public discourse and society’s consciousness. Continue reading