Saving the Rohingya

Author: Regina Paulose

Burma has been involved in the lengthy process of democratization since 2011. Some argue that Burmese reforms are not genuine while others argue that the process is genuine but democratization remains complicated by a myriad of political and cultural issues.[1] Although Burmese President Thein Sein is a remnant  of the former dictatorship, there has been progress in freedom of expression and freedom of the press.[2] Yet, the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Myanmar recently stated that there were “worrying signs of backtracking” and that the patterns witnessed “impose a climate of fear intimidation to the society at large.”[3] Continue reading

What about the Men? The Silence on Male Victims of Sexual Violence in Conflict

By: Ebba Lekvall[1]

 

In June this year, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office hosted a ‘Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict’, co-chaired by Foreign Secretary William Hague and UN Special Envoy Angelia Jolie. The event brought together Government representatives from over 120 countries, over 1,000 experts, faith leaders, youth organizations and representatives of civil society and international organizations. Continue reading

North Korea Sanctions – #Epic Fail

By: Regina Paulose[1]

North Korea (or DPRK) has continued to prove that the sanctions policy against its leadership is a failure. The DPRK has continued to subvert sanctions by earning hard currency through illegitimate means.  It essentially works as an organized crime group. It is important for the international community, in particular the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), to distance itself from its same old paternal routine and think of ways to constructively engage the country so that it can effectively make a difference with regards to proliferation and human rights and so that North Korea can turn away from using illicit channels to raise money. Continue reading

Turning the Tide: Preventing violence against PWA

Written by: Regina Paulose

“The cruelty to and murder of African albinos has not been as widely publicized in our popular media. It should. There’s nothing more abhorrent, nothing more evil than the use of a human soul to expiate some evil spirit; nothing worse than to inflict repeated, continuous pain to a child whose only sin is having been born with a minor genetic variation.”1 Continue reading

Correcting Prejudice in Legal Discourse: Brazil

Written by: Brittany Friedman[1]

Too often, scholarship analyzing child prostitution in Brazil is limited to identifying at-risk groups and evaluating the relationship between sexual exploitation and poverty.  This intellectual pigeonhole has consistently prevented lawmakers and activists from fully addressing the damaging effects of child prostitution on Brazil’s socioeconomic equity.  Indeed, these types of analyses are necessary for the development and implementation of public policy; however, they overlook how subjective interpretations of the law increase social inequality by imbedding cultural stereotypes into legal discourse. Continue reading

Transitional Justice in Post-Conflict Syria

Written by: Regina Paulose

As various parties in and out of Syria prepare for the January 22, 2014 “Geneva II” talks, it is important for the international community to remember that a successful long term peace and transition plan in Syria will require the genuine participation of minority groups in Syria of all backgrounds. While these ideas have been communicated to the parties that will be in attendance, it is important that legitimate mechanisms are in place to ensure the participation of all in the transition and that the participation of all people remains a non-negotiable item during the talks. Continue reading

LGBT Rights: Colonisation and International Human Rights Standards

Written by Garima Tiwari

While 18 countries, home to more than 10 percent of the world’s population, now recognize same-sex marriage, 77 countries still outlaw sodomy.[i]  In seven of these countries, same-sex acts are punishable by death! Just recently, the Supreme Court of India reinstated a sodomy law recriminalizing same-sex relationships in a country home to 1.2 billion people. [ii] Max Fisher says that, “That’s more than the combined populations of the next 20 most-populous countries where same-sex acts are criminalized. If we assume that rates of homosexuality are consistent worldwide, then the number of gay men and women who can be jailed for their sexuality may well have just doubled.”[iii] Continue reading