Armed Conflict and Sexual Violence: A Look at Victims and Perpetrators

Maria Concepcion Badiola

Women are said to be more vulnerable and therefore are more likely to suffer sexual violence. For that reason, the Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols specifically safeguards the rights and safety of them and this measure constitutes a positive way to protect those rights and avoid the perpetration of sexual crimes. However, and despite the legislation is clear on prohibiting sexual violence, a big problem related is the misconception on gender roles as well as the male protection within the law. Continue reading

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Forced Sterilization: Problem Solved?

Author: Regina Paulose

In 1927 the US Supreme Court heard the case of Carrie Buck, a “feeble minded” woman, who was locked up in a state institution. The laws in Virginia gave the superintendent of the institution authority to determine that if it was in the “best interest of the patients and of society” the inmate may be sexually sterilized.  The US Supreme Court voted in favor of Virginia’s statute on forced sterilization. Continue reading

End Conversion Therapy for Minors

Author: Regina Paulose

Conversion therapy (also known as “reparative,” “re-orientation,” or “cure” therapy) is a type of psychotherapy which professionals or ex-gay ministries use to allegedly “cure” or “help” a person who is gay eliminate or suppress feelings towards the same sex. Continue reading

UK EU Referendum and the UK’s role on the world stage

Author: Richard Mark Hampson

The UK EU referendum will have significant important consequences for the UK’s international role. If the UK were to leave the EU, it would remain an important global player. This would be, not least, because of its permanent seat on the UN Security Council. Continue reading

Is Extradition under risk under the EU?

Author: Richard Mark Hampson

On 5 April 2016, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled that the execution of a European Arrest Warrant (‘EAW’) must be deferred if there is a real risk of inhuman or degrading treatment because of the conditions of detention for the person concerned in the requesting state. If the existence of that risk cannot be discounted within a reasonable period, the authority responsible for the execution of the warrant must decide whether the surrender procedure should be deferred or brought to an end. Continue reading

Bangladesh: Justice for All?

Regina Paulose

In 1971 West Pakistan conducted military operations to prevent an alleged “uprising” in East Pakistan. These military campaigns were targeted towards various religious, political, and minority groups. Hundreds of thousands of refugees fled into India which inevitably provoked a conflict between India and Pakistan. By the end of 1971 the geopolitical landscape of South Asia changed as Bangladesh was born. After the 1971 war, Sheik Mujibar Rahman had ordered an Inquiry to determine the number of people who perished as a result of the conflict.[1] To do so Bangladesh passed the 1973 International Crimes Tribunal Act (ICTA), which was enacted to prosecute those responsible for grave international crimes. Continue reading

At the court of the naked Emperor: Reflections on the Assembly of State Parties of the ICC

David Hoile

The Assembly of State Parties, the body charged with the management and oversight of the International Criminal Court, is meeting this week in The Hague. It brings together smug western politicians, lawyers infused with their own self-importance, bored diplomats, naïve fresh-faced interns and a slew of excitable, self-righteous human rights activists from a variety of well-funded western non-governmental organisations. Having spent several days in attendance at this annual jamboree and having spent several years closely observing the behaviour of the ICC, Hans Christian Andersen’s tale The Emperor’s New Clothes comes immediately to mind. Continue reading