Breaking the blade: Takeaways from Sudan’s ban on FGM

Priyal Sepaha

FGM: violations and risks

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) refers to the practice of removal (the extent varies) of the external female genitalia or any damage inflicted due to mutilation injury. FGM is a worldwide human rights issue, affecting an untraceable number of girls. Continue reading

Turkey – A regressive step back to the 1950s

Fozia Hussain

I am here because I listen to my consciousness. Because I have children, because of my children. Because I desire to live in a country where we can still live”. (Kadir Demir, protester)

A law which would provide amnesty to men who have sex with girls under the age of 18 if they marry their victims is currently set to be introduced by the Turkish government. The proposed law could release men who have been sentenced for committing underage sexual offences such as statutory rape. Whilst the age difference between the two people has not been finalised yet, it is likely to be set between 10-15 years. Continue reading

Demystifying the Supreme Court’s judgment in the Ayodhya dispute

Taanya Trivedi

In a historic judgment by the Honourable Supreme Court of India (SCI), the Court put to rest a volatile dispute dating back to 1885 that has been “a flashpoint of continued conflagration,”[1] which has caused enormous loss of life and has unleashed sectarian violence across the country. Continue reading

Rape as a Crime versus Rape as a Punishment: What is going on in India?

Written By Garima Tiwari

Indian village council orders sisters to be raped and paraded naked after their brother elopes with married woman.[i]

This recent news and few other similar incidents evoke a number of sentiments. Of course, it is an illegal order with no statutory backing, yet it is an order of the “members of the society” or as are called “Kangaroo Courts” . And it raises pertinent issues about the perception of women in India within a complex web of Caste, Culture, Religion and a family –community system still very patriarchal. While the Nirbhaya Delhi Gang rape case is still sore and the Government’s “security regime” -in place, headlines of “sentencing to rape”, create a mismatch in legal and societal standards. This post loosely  puts forth ideas on how the simple formula of merely punishing the offender does not even look like a step forward in acknowledging the deep seated problem in a complex society like India. Continue reading

The Death Penalty in India – Necessary?

Author: Kirt Agarwal[1]

India retains capital punishment for a number of serious offences. In December 2007 India was among the minority of countries who voted at the United Nations General Assembly against a moratorium on executions. India retains the death penalty as punishment for a number of crimes including murder, kidnapping, terrorism, desertion, inducement to suicide of a minor or a mentally-diminished person and has more recently in 2013 come to include the offence of rape in certain circumstances. It is mandatory for second convictions for drug trafficking offences. Continue reading