Conscientious objection to military service: Punishment and discriminatory treatment

Author: Emily Graham

 

Conscientious objection to military service is recognised by the United Nations as part of the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief. However, conscientious objectors face a number of serious and negative implications for their refusal to perform military service when States do not recognise or adequately implement this right.[1] Continue reading

Saving the Rohingya

Author: Regina Paulose

 

Since 2011 Burma has been involved in the lengthy process of democratization. Some argue that the reforms in Burma are not genuine while others argue that the process is genuine but democratization remains complicated by a myriad of political and cultural issues.[1] Although Burmese President Thein Sein is a remnant  of the former dictatorship, there has been progress in freedom of expression and freedom of the press.[2] Yet recently, the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Myanmar stated that there were “worrying signs of backtracking” and that the patterns witnessed “impose a climate of fear intimidation to the society at large.”[3] Continue reading

Diminishing Space for the International Criminal Court

From recent events around the global the continued efficacy of the ICC as a global court of last resort is seemingly under threat. The loud silence of the prosecutor new armed conflicts emerge and the old conflicts take new dimensions heightens the question regarding the continued viability of the court. Continue reading

Corporate Liability under Convention Against Organized Crime

By: Regina Paulose

From October 6-7, 2014, the Working Group of Government Experts on Technical Assistance will meet in Vienna, Austria for its 7th session of the Conference of Parties for the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (CATOC).  The provisional agenda includes a discussion of the “liability of legal persons” which is commonly referred to as corporations. Continue reading

(We got) A Dam Problem

By: Regina Paulose

A “dam” is a “barrier constructed to hold back water and raise its level, the resulting reservoir being used in the generation of electricity or as a water supply.”[1] The construction of this kind of infrastructure has become problematic in the areas of human rights and the environment. While most countries in the world suffer from problems as a result of dams, this article focuses on China, India, Ethiopia, Iraq, and Syria. Continue reading

What about the Men? The Silence on Male Victims of Sexual Violence in Conflict

By: Ebba Lekvall[1]

 

In June this year, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office hosted a ‘Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict’, co-chaired by Foreign Secretary William Hague and UN Special Envoy Angelia Jolie. The event brought together Government representatives from over 120 countries, over 1,000 experts, faith leaders, youth organizations and representatives of civil society and international organizations. Continue reading

Stepping Forward Into the Past

The African Union has had a draft resolution that will merge the current continental judicial bodies- the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Court of Justice and Human Rights- into one judicial body- African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples’ Rights. Part of the resolution proposes that the new court should have an enhanced criminal jurisdiction over war crimes, crimes against humanity and acts of genocide on the continent. Without getting into the merits or demerits of such a step, the sting is in the tail of additional proposed changes. Continue reading